Music: Orlando Gibbons - Fantasia (MB XI) - James Johnstone - Data English - Español

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 22:26


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Orlando Gibbons

United Kingdom



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Music: Orlando Gibbons - Fantasia (MB XI) - James Johnstone - Data English - Español




Orlando Gibbons (baptised 25 December 1583 – 5 June 1625) was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods. He was a leading composer in the England of his day.

Biography

Gibbons was born in Cambridge and christened at Oxford the same year - thus appearing in Oxford church records.
Between 1596 and 1598 he sang in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, where his brother Edward Gibbons (1568-1650), eldest of the four sons of William Gibbons, was master of the choristers. The second brother Ellis Gibbons (1573-1603) was also a promising composer, but died young. Orlando entered the university in 1598 and achieved the degree of Bachelor of Music in 1606.[1] James I appointed him a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, where he served as an organist from at least 1615 until his death. In 1623 he became senior organist at the Chapel Royal, with Thomas Tomkins as junior organist. He also held positions as keyboard player in the privy chamber of the court of Prince Charles (later King Charles I), and organist at Westminster Abbey. He died at age 41 in Canterbury of apoplexy, and a monument to him was built in Canterbury Cathedral. A suspicion immediately arose that Gibbons had died of the plague, which was rife in England that year. Two physicians who had been present at his death were ordered to make a report, and performed an autopsy, the account of which survives in The National Archives:
We whose names are here underwritten: having been called to give our counsels to Mr. Orlando Gibbons; in the time of his late and sudden sickness, which we found in the beginning lethargical, or a profound sleep; out of which, we could never recover him, neither by inward nor outward medicines, & then instantly he fell in most strong, & sharp convulsions; which did wring his mouth up to his ears, & his eyes were distorted , as though they would have been thrust out of his head & then suddenly he lost both speech, sight and hearing, & so grew apoplectical & lost the whole motion of every part of his body, & so died. Then here upon (his death being so sudden) rumours were cast out that he did die of the plague, whereupon we . . . caused his body to be searched by certain women that were sworn to deliver the truth, who did affirm that they never saw a fairer corpse. Yet notwithstanding we to give full satisfaction to all did cause the skull to be opened in our presence & we carefully viewed the body, which we found also to be very clean without any show or spot of any contagious matter. In the brain we found the whole & sole cause of his sickness namely a great admirable blackness & syderation in the outside of the brain. Within the brain (being opened) there did issue out abundance of water intermixed with blood & this we affirm to be the only cause of his sudden death.[2]
His death was a shock to peers and the suddenness of his passing drew comment more for the haste of his burial - and of its location at Canterbury rather than the body being returned to London. His wife, Elizabeth, died a little over a year later, aged in her mid-30s, leaving Orlando's eldest brother, Edward, to care for the children left orphans by this event. Of these children only the eldest son, Christopher Gibbons, went on to become a musician.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlando_Gibbons




Biografía

Nacido en la ciudad de Oxford, realizó su formación musical desde 1596 en el King's College de Cambridge donde se nutrió del mundo que le circundaba y es probable que haya dictado clases en aquel lugar, así como en la Universidad de Cambridge (1599). A partir de 1604 es nombrado organista en la Capilla Real de Jacobo I, luego Bachelor of Music en Cambridge (1606), más tarde Músico de Cámara del rey (1619), y finalmente organista de la abadía de Westminster (1623).
Su notable contribución para el desarrollo de la música de la época se dio gracias a su hermosa y genial obra para teclado y voz destinada a los oficios religiosos. Por tales motivos, en 1622 es nombrado Doctor of Music en Oxford. Muere tres años después, el 5 de junio, en Canterbury, en cuya catedral pervive un monumento dedicado a su memoria.






You have an alphabetical guide in the foot of the page in the blog: solitary dog sculptor
In the blog: Solitary Dog Sculptor I, the alphabetical guide is on the right side of the page
Thanks

Usted tiene una guía alfabética al pie de la página en el blog: solitary dog sculptor
En el blog: Solitary Dog Sculptor I, la guia alfabética está en el costado derecho de la página
Gracias




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