Sculpture - Escultura: Auguste Rodin - Part 1 - Data in English y Español - 21 photos - fotos

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 21:01


Open your mind, your heart to other cultures
Abra su mente, su corazón a otras culturas
You will be a better person
Usted será una mejor persona
RM

Auguste Rodin
Burghers of Calais 
London 
Los Burgueses de Calais
Londres


Balzac Toward the Light, Midnight, 1908
Edward Steichen (American, born Luxembourg, 1879–1973)
Direct carbon print

14 3/8 x 19 in. (36.5 x 48.3 cm)
Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1933 (33.43.38)
Not on view   Last Updated April 19, 2011

Rodin moved his rejected plaster model for the Monument to Balzac to his home in Meudon, where he had had the pavilion from the retrospective exhibition of 1900 reconstructed. In the garden at Meudon, Steichen made this dramatic photograph of the work silhouetted against the night sky. The model was not cast in bronze until after Rodin's death. The bronze in the garden of the Hôtel Biron, now the Musée Rodin, in Paris was cast in 1936, and more of them have since been made.
Related
Maps

    World, 1900 a.d.–Present

Timelines

    The United States and Canada, 1900 a.d.–present

    Thematic Essays
    Auguste Rodin (1840–1917)

Works of Art by Collection

    Photographs

Index Terms
Artist

    Rodin, Auguste (French, 1840–1917)
    Steichen, Edward (American, born Luxembourg, 1879–1973)

Material and Technique

    Carbon Print

Subject Matter/Theme

    French Literature
    Literature and Literary Connections
    Photograph of Sculpture

Artist Biography

    Rodin, Auguste (French, 1840–1917)
    Steichen, Edward (American, born Luxembourg, 1879–1973)


Citation
"Edward Steichen: Balzac Toward the Light, Midnight (33.43.38)". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/33.43.38 (October 2006)

Collection Database
See all available object records from Photographs.

   
This work has been published in the Museum's Bulletin or Journal. These articles may or may not represent the most current scholarship.
Vincent, Clare. "Rodin at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: A History of the Collection." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, v. 38, no. 4 (Spring, 1981).
JSTOR | PDF | Supplemental PDFs
Naef, Weston J. "The Art of Seeing: Photographs from the Alfred Stieglitz Collection." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, v. 35, no. 4 (Spring, 1978).
JSTOR | PDF | Supplemental PDFs
Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
About the Timeline |  Credits |  Image Copyrights and Credits |  Share the Timeline
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Home | Works of Art | Curatorial Departments | Collection Database | Features | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | Explore & Learn | The Met Store | Membership | Ways to Give | Plan Your Visit | Calendar | The Cloisters | Concerts & Lectures | Study & Research | Events & Programs | FAQs | Special Exhibitions | My Met Museum | Press Room | Met Podcast | Met Share | Site Index | Now at the Met | MuseumKids

Photograph Credits

Copyright © 2000–2011 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.  Terms and Conditions | Privacy Policy.

Source: Edward Steichen: Balzac Toward the Light, Midnight (33.43.38) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


 
The Bronze Age, also known as The Vanquished, modeled 1876, this bronze cast ca. 1906
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Bronze

H. 72 in. (182.9 cm)
Gift of Mrs. John W. Simpson, 1907 (07.127)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

The lively modeling of the nude and its deceptively realistic appearance represented such a departure from the conventions of academic sculpture of the time that Rodin was accused of casting from a live model, a practice greatly frowned upon. Rodin preserved photographs of the human model on which the sculpture is based, a man named Auguste Neyt. He is shown nude, his clenched right hand on his head and his left hand grasping a pole. It is immediately evident that the sculpture was not cast from the body of the man.

Critics of the period were also dismayed by the subject, for Rodin not only abandoned all of the elaborate repertory of symbols with which academic sculptors habitually equipped their works, but also had stripped the figure of the spear originally carried in his left hand, relying on the expressiveness of the figure itself to convey its meaning. In addition, he changed the title from The Vanquished (Le Vaincu), possibly an allusion to the suffering and demoralization of his countrymen during the Franco-Prussian War, to the classical, but more ambiguous, The Age of Bronze (L'Âge d'Airain). Later the work acquired still other new titles. The Metropolitan Museum has retained the title by which the bronze was known at the time of its purchase from Rodin.
Related
Maps

    World, 1900 a.d.–Present
    Europe, 1900 a.d.–Present

Timelines

    France, 1900 a.d.–present

    Thematic Essays
    Auguste Rodin (1840–1917)

Works of Art by Collection

    European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Index Terms
Artist

    Rodin, Auguste (French, 1840–1917)

Material and Technique

    Bronze
    Bronze from Europe
    Sculpture in the Round from Europe
    Sculpture in the Round from France

Subject Matter/Theme

    Nude

Artist Biography

    Rodin, Auguste (French, 1840–1917)

Technical Glossary

    Bronze


Citation
"Auguste Rodin: The Bronze Age, also known as The Vanquished (07.127)". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/07.127 (October 2006)

Collection Database
See all available object records from European Sculpture and Decorative Arts.

   
This work has been published in the Museum's Bulletin or Journal. These articles may or may not represent the most current scholarship.
Vincent, Clare. "Rodin at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: A History of the Collection." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, v. 38, no. 4 (Spring, 1981).
JSTOR | PDF | Supplemental PDFs
Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
About the Timeline |  Credits |  Image Copyrights and Credits |  Share the Timeline
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Home | Works of Art | Curatorial Departments | Collection Database | Features | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | Explore & Learn | The Met Store | Membership | Ways to Give | Plan Your Visit | Calendar | The Cloisters | Concerts & Lectures | Study & Research | Events & Programs | FAQs | Special Exhibitions | My Met Museum | Press Room | Met Podcast | Met Share | Site Index | Now at the Met | MuseumKids

Photograph Credits

Copyright © 2000–2011 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.  Terms and Conditions | Privacy Policy.

Source: Auguste Rodin: The Bronze Age, also known as The Vanquished (07.127) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art



 
Eternal Spring, also known as Eternal Springtime, probably modeled 1881, this marble executed 1906–7
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Marble

H. 28 in. (71.1 cm)
Bequest of Isaac D. Fletcher, 1917 (17.120.184)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

The torso of the woman in this group is recognizable as that of a model named Adèle Abruzzezzi. Rodin used it repeatedly, and it appears, for example, in a very different context in The Gates of Hell. Eternal Spring is in a lighter vein, however, full of awakening sensuality and implying neither guilt nor punishment to come. The sculpture was extremely popular, and Rodin repeated it often both in marble and in bronze. In 1898, he sold his plaster foundry models with the reproduction rights for this sculpture and its spiritual twin, The Kiss, to the firm of Ferdinand Barbedienne, the commercial foundry. This marble, commissioned from Rodin in 1906 and finished in March 1907, displays the sensuous, veiled quality of carving that creates an impressionistic play of light and shade on the surface of the medium characteristic of the marbles of Rodin's later career.
This work of art also appears on Connections: Date Night
Related
Maps

    World, 1900 a.d.–Present
    Europe, 1900 a.d.–Present

Timelines

    France, 1900 a.d.–present

    Thematic Essays
    Auguste Rodin (1840–1917)

Works of Art by Collection

    European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Index Terms
Artist

    Rodin, Auguste (French, 1840–1917)

Material and Technique

    Marble
    Marble Sculpture in the Round
    Sculpture in the Round from Europe
    Sculpture in the Round from France

Subject Matter/Theme

    Allegorical Figure

Artist Biography

    Rodin, Auguste (French, 1840–1917)

Technical Glossary

    Marble


Citation
"Auguste Rodin: Eternal Spring, also known as Eternal Springtime (17.120.184)". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/17.120.184 (October 2006)

Collection Database
See all available object records from European Sculpture and Decorative Arts.

   
This work has been published in the Museum's Bulletin or Journal. These articles may or may not represent the most current scholarship.
Vincent, Clare. "Rodin at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: A History of the Collection." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, v. 38, no. 4 (Spring, 1981).
JSTOR | PDF | Supplemental PDFs
Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
About the Timeline |  Credits |  Image Copyrights and Credits |  Share the Timeline
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Home | Works of Art | Curatorial Departments | Collection Database | Features | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | Explore & Learn | The Met Store | Membership | Ways to Give | Plan Your Visit | Calendar | The Cloisters | Concerts & Lectures | Study & Research | Events & Programs | FAQs | Special Exhibitions | My Met Museum | Press Room | Met Podcast | Met Share | Site Index | Now at the Met | MuseumKids

Photograph Credits

Copyright © 2000–2011 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.  Terms and Conditions | Privacy Policy.

Source: Auguste Rodin: Eternal Spring, also known as Eternal Springtime (17.120.184) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art



 
Final Study of the Monument to Balzac, modeled 1897, this bronze cast 1972
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Bronze

H. 41 3/4 in. (106 cm)
Gift of Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, 1984 (1984.364.15)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

This study differs little from the finished Monument to Balzac except that it is less than half the size. It was preceded by studies of the dressing gown alone, a simulation of one that Balzac preferred to wear when writing. A study of the full figure wrapped in the dressing gown followed. The final study, simplified and more a symbol than a portrait, attempted to convey a strength of character analogous to the power of Balzac's prose. It has been said that in the attempt, Rodin created the first truly modern sculpture.
Related
Maps

    World, 1900 a.d.–Present
    Europe, 1900 a.d.–Present

Timelines

    France, 1900 a.d.–present

    Thematic Essays
    Auguste Rodin (1840–1917)

Works of Art by Collection

    European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Index Terms
Artist

    Rodin, Auguste (French, 1840–1917)

Material and Technique

    Bronze
    Bronze from Europe
    Preparatory Study
    Preparatory Study Sculpture
    Sculpture in the Round from Europe
    Sculpture in the Round from France

Subject Matter/Theme

    French Literature
    Literature and Literary Connections
    Portrait Sculpture
    Portrait Sculpture from Europe
    Portrait Sculpture from France

Artist Biography

    Rodin, Auguste (French, 1840–1917)

Technical Glossary

    Bronze


Citation
"Auguste Rodin: Final Study of the Monument to Balzac (1984.364.15)". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1984.364.15 (October 2006)

Collection Database
See all available object records from European Sculpture and Decorative Arts.

Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
About the Timeline |  Credits |  Image Copyrights and Credits |  Share the Timeline
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Home | Works of Art | Curatorial Departments | Collection Database | Features | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | Explore & Learn | The Met Store | Membership | Ways to Give | Plan Your Visit | Calendar | The Cloisters | Concerts & Lectures | Study & Research | Events & Programs | FAQs | Special Exhibitions | My Met Museum | Press Room | Met Podcast | Met Share | Site Index | Now at the Met | MuseumKids

Photograph Credits

Copyright © 2000–2011 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.  Terms and Conditions | Privacy Policy.

Source: Auguste Rodin: Final Study of the Monument to Balzac (1984.364.15) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art



 
Final Study of the Monument to Balzac, modeled 1897, this bronze cast 1972
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Bronze

H. 41 3/4 in. (106 cm)
Gift of Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, 1984 (1984.364.15)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

This study differs little from the finished Monument to Balzac except that it is less than half the size. It was preceded by studies of the dressing gown alone, a simulation of one that Balzac preferred to wear when writing. A study of the full figure wrapped in the dressing gown followed. The final study, simplified and more a symbol than a portrait, attempted to convey a strength of character analogous to the power of Balzac's prose. It has been said that in the attempt, Rodin created the first truly modern sculpture.
Related
Maps

    World, 1900 a.d.–Present
    Europe, 1900 a.d.–Present

Timelines

    France, 1900 a.d.–present

    Thematic Essays
    Auguste Rodin (1840–1917)

Works of Art by Collection

    European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Index Terms
Artist

    Rodin, Auguste (French, 1840–1917)

Material and Technique

    Bronze
    Bronze from Europe
    Preparatory Study
    Preparatory Study Sculpture
    Sculpture in the Round from Europe
    Sculpture in the Round from France

Subject Matter/Theme

    French Literature
    Literature and Literary Connections
    Portrait Sculpture
    Portrait Sculpture from Europe
    Portrait Sculpture from France

Artist Biography

    Rodin, Auguste (French, 1840–1917)

Technical Glossary

    Bronze


Citation
"Auguste Rodin: Final Study of the Monument to Balzac (1984.364.15)". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1984.364.15 (October 2006)

Collection Database
See all available object records from European Sculpture and Decorative Arts.

Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
About the Timeline |  Credits |  Image Copyrights and Credits |  Share the Timeline
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Home | Works of Art | Curatorial Departments | Collection Database | Features | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | Explore & Learn | The Met Store | Membership | Ways to Give | Plan Your Visit | Calendar | The Cloisters | Concerts & Lectures | Study & Research | Events & Programs | FAQs | Special Exhibitions | My Met Museum | Press Room | Met Podcast | Met Share | Site Index | Now at the Met | MuseumKids

Photograph Credits

Copyright © 2000–2011 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.  Terms and Conditions | Privacy Policy.

Source: Auguste Rodin: Final Study of the Monument to Balzac (1984.364.15) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art



 
The Hand of God, modeled ca. 1896, this marble executed ca. 1907
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Marble

H. 29 in. (73.7 cm)
Gift of Edward D. Adams, 1908 (08.210)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

Toward the end of his career, Rodin began to use giant hands in a series of original and idiosyncratic arrangements, with titles such as The Hand of God, The Hand of the Devil (1903), The Cathedral (1908), and The Secret (ca. 1910). The first of these represents divine creation expressed in terms of the sculptor's art: the rough stone is both primeval matter and the sculptor's medium; the smooth, white emerging forms held by the hand are the bodies of the first man and woman, while the great, life-giving hand itself is a symbol of the original Creator, and, perhaps quite literally, of the sculptor as well. The Hand of God was another of Rodin's works that has had wide appeal, and there are numerous versions of it, both in marble and in bronze. This marble was commissioned from Rodin in 1906 by one of the Metropolitan Museum's trustees.

Source: Auguste Rodin: The Hand of God (08.210) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 






François-Auguste-René Rodin (12 November 1840 – 17 November 1917), known as Auguste Rodin (English pronunciation: /oʊˈɡuːst roʊˈdæn/ oh-goost roh-dan, French pronunciation: [ogyst ʁɔdɛ̃]), was a French sculptor. Although Rodin is generally considered the progenitor of modern sculpture,[1] he did not set out to rebel against the past. He was schooled traditionally, took a craftsman-like approach to his work, and desired academic recognition,[2] although he was never accepted into Paris's foremost school of art.
Sculpturally, Rodin possessed a unique ability to model a complex, turbulent, deeply pocketed surface in clay. Many of his most notable sculptures were roundly criticized during his lifetime. They clashed with the predominant figure sculpture tradition, in which works were decorative, formulaic, or highly thematic. Rodin's most original work departed from traditional themes of mythology and allegory, modeled the human body with realism, and celebrated individual character and physicality. Rodin was sensitive of the controversy surrounding his work, but refused to change his style. Successive works brought increasing favor from the government and the artistic community.
From the unexpected realism of his first major figure—inspired by his 1875 trip to Italy—to the unconventional memorials whose commissions he later sought, Rodin's reputation grew, such that he became the preeminent French sculptor of his time. By 1900, he was a world-renowned artist. Wealthy private clients sought Rodin's work after his World's Fair exhibit, and he kept company with a variety of high-profile intellectuals and artists. He married his life-long companion, Rose Beuret, in the last year of both their lives. His sculpture suffered a decline in popularity after his death in 1917, but within a few decades his legacy solidified. Rodin remains one of the few sculptors widely known outside the visual arts community.




Madame X, ca. 1907
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Marble

H. 19 1/2 in. (49.5 cm)
Gift of Thomas F. Ryan, 1910 (11.173.6)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

The subject of this portrait, Anna-Elizabeth de Noailles (1876–1933), belonged to the literary group known as the Nouvelle Pléiade. A contemporaneous photograph shows her to have been an elegant lady, with limpid eyes, high-piled hair, and a prominent nose. One sees that by suppressing the nose, Rodin could have made her look like the fashionable portraits of the time. But Madame X was an aristocrat as well as a poet and intellectual, the daughter of a Romanian princess and granddaughter of a diplomat and man of letters who had translated Dante into classical Greek. Her husband was Count Mathieu de Noailles, scion of a French family who traced its noble lineage to the eleventh century. In the thrust of the nose, tilt of the head, and veiling of the eyes, Rodin has made of her portrait a symbol as well as a likeness. The countess evidently saw only the nose, for the checklist of the Museum's purchases from Rodin in 1910 records her refusal of the marble and Rodin's preferred title: Madame X; "otherwise," he wrote, "she is a very intelligent person."

Source: Auguste Rodin: Madame X (11.173.6) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


 
Nero, ca. 1900–1905
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Graphite with wash of watercolor and gouache on cream paper

12 3/4 x 10 in. (32.4 x 3 7/8 cm)
John Stewart Kennedy Fund, 1910 (10.66.5)
Not on view   Last Updated April 19, 2011

Nero, or, as it is titled in French on the lower right side of the drawing, Néron, is one of Rodin's rapid sketches that show the results of later reworking. It has been discovered that this figure was originally that of a woman. The bold outline of the final version has been drawn in pencil over washes of watercolor and gouache.

Source: Auguste Rodin: Nero (10.66.5) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


 
A plaster of The Age of Bronze



François-Auguste-René Rodin (París, 12 de noviembre de 1840 - Meudon, 17 de noviembre de 1917) fue un escultor francés contemporáneo a la corriente Impresionista. Enmarcado en el academicismo más absoluto de la escuela escultórica neoclásica, es el escultor encargado no sólo de poner fin a más de dos siglos en busca de la mimesis en las artes tridimensionales, sino de dar además un nuevo rumbo a la ya obsoleta concepción del monumento y la escultura pública. Es por esto que Rodin ha sido denominado en la historia del arte: «el primer moderno».


A portrait of Rodin by his friend Alphonse Legros


Auguste Rodin


Auguste Rodin
Grubleren - The Thinker - El Pensador 



Auguste Rodin by Edward Steichen 1902


Auguste Rodin by Féliz Nadar 1893


Camille Claudel (1864–1943)


Auguste Rodin
Grubleren - The Thinker - El Pensador 






Rodin in 1914


 
Rodin observing work on the monument to Victor Hugo at the studio of his assistant Henri Lebossé in 1896










Sculpture - Escultura: Auguste Rodin - Part 1 - Data in English y Español - 21 photos - fotos








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Usted tiene una guía alfabética al pie de la página en el blog: solitary dog sculptor
En el blog: Solitary Dog Sculptor I, la guia alfabética está en el costado derecho de la página
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