Music: Hosokawa- Concerto for Flute and Orchestra - Bio data

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 14:03

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Toshio Hosokawa


video


Hosokawa- Concerto for Flute and Orchestra





Toshio Hosokawa (細川 俊夫 Hosokawa Toshio?, born 23 October 1955 in Hiroshima, Japan) is a Japanese composer of contemporary classical music.

Biography

Hosokawa studied with Yun Isang at the Berlin University of the Arts. Since 1998, Hosokawa has served as Composer-in-Residence at the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra. In 2004, Hosokawa became a guest professor at Tokyo College of Music. In 2001, Hosokawa became a member of Akademie der Künste, Berlin.

Invited by Walter Fink, he was the 18th composer featured in the annual Komponistenporträt of the Rheingau Musik Festival in 2008, in chamber music, played by the Arditti Quartet and Mayumi Miyata (Shō), and the oratorio Voiceless Voice in Hiroshima, performed by the WDR Symphony Orchestra and Choir, Cologne conducted by Rupert Huber.[1]
Awards and honors

Hosokawa has received the following awards and honors.

    First Prize in the Composition Competition which marked the 100th Anniversary of the Berliner Philharmoniker (1982)
    Rheingau Musikpreis (1998)
    Duisburger Musikpreis (1998)
    musica viva-Preis der ARD und BMW AG (2001)
    the 39th Suntory Music Award (2007)

Compositions
Opera
Premiere     Title     Description     Libretto and source
19 Apr 1998, Gasteig/ Munich Biennale     Vision of Lear     Opera in 2 acts, 105'     Tadashi Suzuki, after his stage play The Tale of Lear
08 Jul 2004, Théâtre du Jeu de Paume/ Festival d'Aix-en-Provence     Hanjo     Opera in 1 act, 80'     the composer, after the English translation by Donald Keene of the modern Noh play by Yukio Mishima
03 May 2011, La Monnaie, Bruxelles     Matsukaze     Opera in one act, 80'     Hannah Dübgen, after the Noh play Matsukaze by Zeami
Oratorio

    Voiceless Voice in Hiroshima for soloists, narrators, chorus, tape (ad lib.) and orchestra (1989/2001) after Matsuo Bashō, Paul Celan and Genbaku no Ko[2]

Orchestral

    In die Tiefe der Zeit (Into the Depths of Time)
    Ferne Landschaft (1987), recorded 1988, Denon, The Contemporary Music of Japan, COCO-70960, Kyoto Symphony Orchestra, Koizumi, Kazuhiro conductor.
    Circulating Ocean (2005)

Concertante

    Flute Concerto Per Sonare (1988)
    Cello concerto (1997)
    Voyage II for bassoon and ensemble (1997)
    Horn Concerto Moment of Blossoming (2010)

Chamber music

    Landscape V for shō and string quartet (1993)
    Silent Flowers for string quartet (1998)
    Deep Silence (2002), duets for shō (bamboo mouth organ), and accordion in the Gagaku style, including:
        Cloudscapes - Moon Night
        Wie ein Atmen im Lichte after a drawing of Rudolf Steiner
        Sen V
    Blossoming for string quartet (2007)
    Lied II (リート Ⅱ) for viola and piano (2008)
    Für Walter for soprano saxophone and piano, percussion ad libitum (2010), dedicated to Walter Fink for his 80th birthday[3]
    Spell (呪文) for violin solo (2010)
    Lullaby of Itsuki: from Japanese Folk Songs (五木の子守歌 −日本民謡より−) for violin and piano (2011)
    Threnody: To the Victims of the Tōhoku Earthquake 3.11 (哀歌 −東日本大震災の犠牲者に捧げる−) for viola solo (2011)

References

    ^ Klangmächtige Kathedralen Gerd Döring in Frankfurter Rundschau, 2 September 2008 (in German)
    ^ [1]
    ^ "Komponistenwerkstatt: Walter Fink zum 80. Geburtstag" (in German). Rheingau Musik Festival. 2010. Retrieved 5 August 2010.

Further reading

    Narazaki, Yoko. 2001. "Hosokawa, Toshio". The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, second edition, edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrrell. London: Macmillan Publishers
.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toshio_Hosokawa

Music: Hosokawa- Concerto for Flute and Orchestra - Bio data






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NASA: Brazil - Amazon - Fire in the Xingu River Basin - 25.06.13

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 13:10

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Fire in the Xingu River Basin
Color bar for Fire in the Xingu River Basin
acquired 1999 - 2010 download large image (6 MB, JPEG, 7816x4137)
When most people think of the Amazon rainforest, they envision a vast expanse of green jungle, dripping with moisture year round. Some parts of the Amazon do receive relentless rain, but other regions have a distinct dry season when little or no rain falls.
The southeastern Amazon, in the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso and Pará, has a four-to-five month dry season that limits rains to a trickle. Lush vegetation survives by sending roots up to 10 meters (30 feet) into the ground. Ecologists worry that as climate change brings hotter, drier conditions to the region, the southern edge of the Amazon could easily transition from forest to tropical savanna known in South America as the Cerrado.
The boundary between rainforest and the Cerrado cuts across the Amazon Basin in a ragged line that runs through the Brazilian states of Rondônia, Mato Grosso, and Pará. The boundary has emerged as one of the most interesting parts of the Amazon to study because it is at this forest frontier where the needs of modern Brazilian society—cleared land for farmers, ranchers, villages, and roads—come into direct conflict with those of the rainforest and the large populations of indigenous peoples who live within the forest.
Then there are the fires. Satellite and ground observations of the forest edge show evidence of what ecologists call “understory” fires—low-intensity blazes that creep along the leaf littler on the forest floor but never get hot enough to burn up through the canopy. Since the fires remain beneath the canopy, NASA satellites designed to monitor fire activity rarely detect understory fires (unlike those that release more energy, such as deforestation or agricultural management fires). But satellites can sense the subtle changes in the forest canopy in the wake of these understory fires, as the damaged vegetation slowly dies and new trees grow back.
Distinguishing between understory fire damage and other types of forest disturbance—such as selective logging and deforestation for agriculture—is not straightforward with satellite imagery, explained NASA scientist Doug Morton. In the last few years, Morton has worked out a new technique based on data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor that makes it easier to distinguish understory fires from similar-looking forest disturbances.
The technique has made it possible for Morton and his colleagues to map the distribution of understory fires across the entire southern Amazon basin for the first time. (See the large image for the distribution of understory fires across the basin). Morton found that understory forest fires burned more than 85,500 square kilometers (33,000 square miles), or 2.8 percent of the forest, between 1999 and 2010.
The prevailing theory has been that deforestation and understory fires go hand in hand, because deforestation creates gaps in the rainforest canopy that dry out the forest floor. Surprisingly, Morton’s mapping found no correlation between understory fires and deforestation. In fact, even in areas with little or no deforestation—such as the large reserves in the Xingu River Basin set aside for Brazil’s indigenous people—the analysis detected very large understory fires, with some areas burning frequently.
The Xingu River Basin saw more forests with repeated burning than nearly anywhere else in the Amazon over the study period, with some areas facing four or more fires. As shown in the map above, the fires within the indigenous reserve were concentrated along the banks of the Xingu River; rivers are the main transportation network for indigenous groups in the Xingu basin, similar to other remote regions of the Amazon where roads are scarce or seasonally flooded. Amongst the farms and ranches on the forest frontier beyond the reserve, fires were also common but scattered more broadly.
“One of the things this research shows is that deforestation probably isn’t the key driver of understory fires we once thought it was,” said Morton. “The simple presence of people—indigenous or otherwise—along with hot, dry weather is all you need for large understory fires to burn along the southern edge of the Amazon.”
Morton’s next question: “Are the forests along the edges of the Amazon able to withstand all these understory fires or will we see a gradual transition from forest to savanna over time?”
NASA Earth Observatory images by Jesse Allen, using data provided by Douglas Morton (NASA/GSFC). Caption by Adam Voiland.
Instrument: 
Terra - MODIS


NASA: Brazil - Amazon - Fire in the Xingu River Basin - 25.06.13








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Poetry: Jorge Luis Borges - To A Cat - Browning Decides To Be A Poet - Adam Cast Forth - Shinto - Links Poesia J. L. Borges in Italiano - Español - English

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 12:23

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To A Cat

Mirrors are not more silent
nor the creeping dawn more secretive;
in the moonlight, you are that panther
we catch sight of from afar.
By the inexplicable workings of a divine law,
we look for you in vain;
More remote, even, than the Ganges or the setting sun,
yours is the solitude, yours the secret.
Your haunch allows the lingering
caress of my hand. You have accepted,
since that long forgotten past,
the love of the distrustful hand.
You belong to another time. You are lord
of a place bounded like a dream.  


Browning Decides To Be A Poet

in these red labyrinths of London
I find that I have chosen
the strangest of all callings,
save that, in its way, any calling is strange.
Like the alchemist
who sought the philosopher's stone
in quicksilver,
I shall make everyday words--
the gambler's marked cards, the common coin--
give off the magic that was their
when Thor was both the god and the din,
the thunderclap and the prayer.
In today's dialect
I shall say, in my fashion, eternal things:
I shall try to be worthy
of the great echo of Byron.
This dust that I am will be invulnerable.
If a woman shares my love
my verse will touch the tenth sphere of the concentric heavens;
if a woman turns my love aside
I will make of my sadness a music,
a full river to resound through time.
I shall live by forgetting myself.
I shall be the face I glimpse and forget,
I shall be Judas who takes on
the divine mission of being a betrayer,
I shall be Caliban in his bog,
I shall be a mercenary who dies
without fear and without faith,
I shall be Polycrates, who looks in awe
upon the seal returned by fate.
I will be the friend who hates me.
The persian will give me the nightingale, and Rome the sword.
Masks, agonies, resurrections
will weave and unweave my life,
and in time I shall be Robert Browning.

 

Adam Cast Forth

Was there a Garden or was the Garden a dream?
Amid the fleeting light, I have slowed myself and queried,
Almost for consolation, if the bygone period
Over which this Adam, wretched now, once reigned supreme,

Might not have been just a magical illusion
Of that God I dreamed. Already it's imprecise
In my memory, the clear Paradise,
But I know it exists, in flower and profusion,

Although not for me. My punishment for life
Is the stubborn earth with the incestuous strife
Of Cains and Abels and their brood; I await no pardon.

Yet, it's much to have loved, to have known true joy,
To have had -- if only for just one day --
The experience of touching the living Garden. 


Shinto

When sorrow lays us low
for a second we are saved
by humble windfalls
of the mindfulness or memory:
the taste of a fruit, the taste of water,
that face given back to us by a dream,
the first jasmine of November,
the endless yearning of the compass,
a book we thought was lost,
the throb of a hexameter,
the slight key that opens a house to us,
the smell of a library, or of sandalwood,
the former name of a street,
the colors of a map,
an unforeseen etymology,
the smoothness of a filed fingernail,
the date we were looking for,
the twelve dark bell-strokes, tolling as we count,
a sudden physical pain.

Eight million Shinto deities
travel secretly throughout the earth.
Those modest gods touch us--
touch us and move on.  





Poetry: Jorge Luis Borges - To A Cat - Browning Decides To Be A Poet - Adam Cast Forth - Shinto - Links Poesia J. L. Borges in Italiano - Español - English













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Photos - Fotos: Walls - The Boston Globe - The Big Picture - 41 photos - 23.06.13

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 18:59

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Walls

They keep things out or enclose them within. They're symbols of power, and a means of control. They're canvases for art, backdrops for street theater, and placards for political messages. They're just waiting for when nobody's looking to receive graffiti. Walls of all kinds demarcate our lives. -- Lane Turner (41 photos total).
Note: You can now follow @bigpicture on the social network App.net, where you own your own data. If you'd like to try it out, we've also got some free invites for our readers.

Workers clean the curtain wall of the 40-story National Bank of Economic Social Development in Rio de Janeiro on December 12, 2012. (Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)

2
Maintenance workers are silhouetted by bright morning sunshine reflecting off the windows on a wall of the Shard building in London on April 30, 2013. (Andrew Winning/Reuters) #

3
A young boy jumps through a hole as others peer through the wall of a cell at Muzenze prison on November 21, 2012 in Goma, Congo. Almost all inmates of Goma's main prison managed to break out after prison warders abandoned their positions to flee from advancing M23 rebels. (Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images) #

4
A worker toils outside a broken cement wall in the collapsed garment factory building in search for bodies on May 2, 2013 in Savar, Bangladesh. (Wong Maye-E/Associated Press) #

5
"Por Una Cabeza" by artist Pelado covers a wall in the Palermo neighborhood of Buenos Aires on March 5, 2013. Buenos Aires has become one of the world's top capitals for international street art. (Natacha Pisarenko/Associated Press) #

6
People cast shadows on a wall covered in graffiti in Rio de Janeiro, May 11, 2013. Street art and graffiti are legal if done with the consent of building owners. (Pilar Olivares/Reuters) #

7
A woman walks along the East Side Gallery, part of the remains of the former Wall in Berlin on March 17, 2013. (Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images) #

8
Pedestrians walk past a wall of soccer balls displayed at a soccer equipment shop in Tokyo on February 21, 2013. (Kimimasa Mayama/EPA) #

9
Chinese artist Liu Bolin stands painted in front of a wall of magazines in the Kunstverein (art association) in Ludwigsburg, Germany on May 15, 2013. In his art works he blends himself with the background. (Bernd Weissbrod/EPA) #

10
A man checks an apartment with the walls blown off at the site of a blast in Reyhanli, Syria on May 13, 2013. (Umit Bektas/Reuters) #

11
An employee works in front of a wall of monitors in the central control room of the No.5 reactor at Chubu Electric Power Co.'s Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki, Japan on May 17, 2013. (Toru Hanai/Reuters) #

12
A US Forestry fire fighter confronts a wall of flames during an out of control wildfire on May 2, 2013 in Camarillo, Calif. (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images) #

13
A demonstrator lights up a spray can before a wall of riot police in Mexico City on December 1, 2012 during a post-election protest. (Eduardo Verdugo/Associated Press) #

14
Protesters move blocks of cement as they dismantle a wall in front of the presidential palace during a demonstration against President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo on December 11, 2012. (Hassan Ammar/Associated Press) #

15
Guests admire the west wall of the The Old Royal Naval College's Painted Hall following its first restoration in 50 years on May 2, 2013 in Greenwich, England. (Oli Scarff/Getty Images) #

16
People hang out on the beach next to the border fence separating Mexico from the US as the day comes to an end in Tijuana, Mexico on September 22, 2012. (Dario Lopez-Mills/Associated Press) #

17
A dog walks past the steel bars of the Berlin Wall memorial on November 21, 2012 at Bernauer Strasse in Berlin. (Britta Pedersen/AFP/Getty Images) #

18
Shin-Soo Choo of the Cincinnati Reds hits the outfield wall trying to make a catch at Wrigley Field on May 5, 2013 in Chicago. (Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images) #

19
Competitors at the Gladiator Rock N' Run maneuver the "beast," a wall they must scale to make it to the finish of the race in Irvine, Calif. (Mindy Schauer/The Orange County Register/Associated Press) #

20
A section of a half-mile long concrete wall, six feet tall and a foot or so thick, now covered with murals, built in the 1940s divides yards in Detroit on March 28, 2013. The wall was built with a simple aim: separate homes planned for middle-class whites from blacks who had already built small houses or owned land with plans to build in the neighborhood. It couldn't separate people on its own, people and policies would see to that, but it was enough to satisfy the Federal Housing Administration to approve and back loans. (Paul Sancya/Associated Press) #

21
The back of a Volkswagen Golf sticks out of the wall of a family home in Meissenheim, Germany on June 2, 2013. A drunk novice driver lost control of the vehicle. (NOTE: this photograph has been digitally altered to obscure the licence plate. The European Pressphoto Agency reports that the German press agency dpa provided the image, and must obscure the licence plate per German law.) (Wolfgang Kuenstle/EPA) #

22
An Afghan man takes a shortcut by climbing a wall at a hilltop in Kabul on May 11, 2012. (Danish Siddiqui/Reuters) #

23
Members of the 18th Street gang attend a mass at the prison of Izalco in El Salvador on April 13, 2012. (Ulises Rodriguez/Reuters) #

24
A child plays on a sticky wall on International Children's Day at Children's Palace in the Dongcheng district in Beijing on June 1, 2013. (Andy Wong/Associated Press) #

25
Cosmo Sarson's mural of Jesus breakdancing on the wall beside The Canteen is reflected in a window on June 11, 2012 in Bristol, England. The artist was commissioned by The Canteen to paint the wall, which is directly opposite Banksy's Mild Mild West. The controversial 'Breakdancing Jesus' was inspired by an actual event in the Vatican where breakdancers performed to an applauding Pope John Paul II in 2004, is likely to be the latest attraction for graffiti tourists visiting Bristol, often seen as the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images) #

26
A child runs over a wall of sandbags near the flooding river Elbe in Dresden, Germany on June 6, 2013. (Jens Meyer/Associated Press) #

27
Girls play on a trampoline near a home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah on November 2, 2012. (Jim Urquhart/Reuters) #

28
A competitor reacts after he performs at the Climbing Wall competition during the 2013 X-Games at Jiangwan Stadium in Shanghai on June 10, 2013. (Carlos Barria/Reuters) #

29
Soldiers rappel down a wall during a military graduation parade for trainees from the Libyan Army "Thunderbolt" Special Forces unit in Benghazi on May 16, 2013. (Esam Al-Fetori/Reuters) #

30
Liron Sitrek rappels down the wall of a hotel in La Paz on February 27, 2013. (Aizar Raldes/AFP/Getty Images) #

31
A woman looks from behind a brick wall of her house in the old quarters of Delhi on May 15, 2013. (Mansi Thapliyal/Reuters) #

32
Ivy crawls over a portrait of the Virgin Mary on a wall of a house in Madrid on March 22, 2013. (Juan Medina/Reuters) #

33
The Oppidans team huddle during the Eton Wall Game at Eton college in Eton on November 17, 2012. Originating in 1766, the game is played on a narrow strip 110 meters long up against a wall. The idea is to move the ball along the wall with your feet and score a goal at the far end. Goals are very rare, the last one scored was a hundred years ago in 1909. (Eddie Keogh/Reuters) #

34
Stone walls partition a hillside on the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland on May 29, 2012. (Jake Coyle/Associated Press) #

35
Tourists climb the Great Wall after a snow in Luanping, China on December 14, 2012. (Alexander F. Yuan/Associated Press) #

36
Waves crash against the sea wall at Seaham Harbour as successive bands of heavy rain moved across the British Isles on December 20, 2012. (Owen Humphreys/PA/Associated Press) #

37
Kyle Larson slides along the wall as Eric McClure goes low after the cars were involved in a multi-car crash on the final lap of a NASCAR auto race at Daytona International Speedway on February 23, 2013, in Daytona Beach, Fla. (John Raoux/Associated Press)#

38
A man is reflected in the electronic board on the wall of a securities firm in Tokyo on May 16, 2013. (Koji Sasahara/Associated Press)#

39
Graffiti artist Chimere paints a mural next to a highway in Dakar on May 9, 2013. (Joe Penney/Reuters)#

40
Sona Nakarmi, 7, writes on a wall at the Saraswati Temple during the Shreepanchami festival in Kathmandu on February 15, 2013. Children are given their first writing and reading lessons at the temple during this festival in the belief that the goddess of education, Saraswati, will help them excel in education. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)#

41
An Indian devotee rests his forehead in respect on the wall of the Banke Bihari temple during Holi celebrations in Vrindavan, India on March 27, 2013. (Altaf Qadri/Associated Press)#

Photos - Fotos: Walls - The Boston Globe - The Big Picture - 41 photos - 23.06.13





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Mis blogs son una casa abierta a todas las culturas, religiones y países. Se un seguidor si quieres, con esta acción usted está construyendo una nueva cultura de la tolerancia, la mente y el corazón abiertos para la paz, el amor y el respeto humano. Gracias:)



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Music: Friedrich Gulda - Mozart Concerto 26 (Coronation) - 4 Vids - Data en Espanol and English - Links

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 18:16

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video

Mozart concerto 26 (Coronation) - 1. Allegro (1/2) (Gulda)




video

Mozart concerto 26 (Coronation) - 1. Allegro (2/2) (Gulda)


El Concierto para piano n.º 26 en re mayor, K. 537, fue escrito por Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart y completado el 24 de febrero de 1788. Es popularmente conocido como el Concierto de la Coronación.

Origen del sobrenombre «de la Coronación»

El nombre tradicional asociado a esta obra no fue ideado por el propio Mozart, ni el concierto fue escrito para la ocasión para la que la posteridad le ha dado su nombre. Mozart comenta en una carta a su esposa en abril de 1789 que acababa de interpretar este concierto ante la corte. Pero el sobrenombre «de la Coronación» se derivó por su interpretación en la obra en la época de la coronación de Leopoldo II como Emperador del Sacro Imperio Romano Germánico en octubre de 1790 en Fráncfort del Meno. En el mismo concierto, Mozart también interpretó el Concierto para piano n.º 19 (KV 459). Conocemos este dato gracias a que Johann André de Offenbach publicó las primeras ediciones de ambos conciertos en 1794, y los identificó en sus páginas de título como conciertos interpretados con ocasión de la coronación de Leopoldo II.

Alan Tyson, en su introducción al facsímil de la partitura autógrafa (que se conserva en la actualidad en la Biblioteca y Museo Morgan de Nueva York) publicada por Dover Publications, comenta que «aunque el KV 459 ha sido en ocasiones llamado Concierto "de la Coronación", este título ha sido casi siempre aplicado al KV 537».1

Estructura

El concierto consta de tres movimientos:

    Allegro, en re mayor, compás de 4/4.
    (Larghetto), la mayor, compás de 2/2.
    (Allegretto), en re mayor, compás de 2/4.

El tempo del segundo y tercer movimientos se da entre paréntesis porque en el autógrafo no aparecen escritos por la mano del propio Mozart, sino que parecen haber sido anotados por otra persona. (La Neue Mozart-Ausgabe [NMA V/15/8, ed. Wolfgang Rehm] sitúa la nota "Tempobezeichnung im Autograph von fremder Hand" ["Indicación de tempo en el autógrafo por otra mano"] en ambos movimientos,2 aunque la antigua edición de obras completas de Breitkopf & Härtel no presenta ninguna indicación de que los tempi no fueron anotados por el propio Mozart.3 )

La parte de piano inacabada

Hay un rasgo muy inusual en este concierto. Además de omitir el tempi de dos de los movimientos, Mozart también, según las palabras de Tyson, "no hizo ninguna anotación para la mano izquierda del piano en una gran número de compases a lo largo de la obra."5 Como se puede ver en el facsímil de Dover Publications, extensos pasajes de la parte de solo simplemente no tiene nada para la mano izquierda, incluído el inicio del solo (movimiento 1, compases 81–99) y el segundo movimiento entero.6 De hecho, no hay otro concierto para piano de Mozart en el que una buena parte del solo se haya dejado inacabada por parte del compositor. La primera edición de 1794 presenta estos huecos rellenos, y gran parte de los expertos en Mozart, tales como Alfred Einstein y Alan Tyson, han asumido que las adiciones fueron incluidas por el editor Johann André.

Debió ser observado, no obstante, que los principios de todos los pasajes que estaban rellenos en la primera edición solo incluyen patrones de acompañamiento como figuras de bajo Alberti y acordes. Por ejemplo, los compases 145–151 del primer movimiento, que implican pasajes más virtuosísticos de la obra, están totalmente completos en el autógrafo. Para las secciones menos complejas del solo, está claro que Mozart "sabía perfectamente bien qué es lo que tenía que tocar"7 , y por tanto los dejó incompletos.

La antigua partitura de este concierto de las Obras Completas de Mozart de Breitkopf & Härtel no hace ninguna distinción entre lo que Mozart escribió realmente y lo que André (o alguien encargado por él) suplió. Sin embargo, el volumen de la Neue Mozart-Ausgabe referenciaba las adiciones de André en fuente de menor tamaño, con el objetivo de distinguirlas con mayor facilidad de las notas originales de Mozart.
Acogida de la crítica

Mientras este concierto ha gozado de popularidad debida a su estilo bello y rococó (o galante), en la actualidad se considera que no alcanza el nivel de calidad de los doce conciertos para piano vieneses previos o del posterior Concierto para piano n.º 27. Esto se traduce en una buena acogida crítica, pues el KV 537 fue uno de los conciertos para teclado de Mozart más célebres a lo largo de la historia, especialmente durante el siglo XIX. En 1935, Friedrich Blume, editor de la edición Eulenburg de esta obra, la calificó como "el más conocido y más frecuentemente interpretado" de los conciertos para piano de Mozart.8 Pero escribiendo en 1945, Alfred Einstein comentó:

    ...Es muy mozartiano, mientras que al mismo tiempo no expresa el total ni siquiera la mitad de Mozart. Es, de hecho, tan 'mozartesco' que uno podría decirque en él Mozart se imitaba a sí mismo --tarea que no era difícil para él. Es tanto brillante como amable, especialmente en el movimiento lento; éste es muy simple, incluso primitivo, en su relación entre el solo y el tutti, y tan completamente fácil de entender que hasta el siglo XIX siempre lo aprovechó sin dificultad.7

Sin embargo, el concierto "de la Coronación" continúa siendo frecuentemente interpretado en la actualidad.
Referencias

    ↑ Alan Tyson, "Introduction," en Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 26 in D Major ("Coronation"), K. 537--The Autograph Score. (Nueva York: la Biblioteca y Museo Morgan, en asociación con Dover Publications, 1991), pp. vii.
    ↑ Véase Neue Mozart-Ausgabe, Serie V, Werkgruppe 15, Band 8, ed. Wolfgang Rehm (Baerenreiter-Verlag, Kassel, 1960), pp. 47, 56.
    ↑ Véase Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Piano Concertos Nos. 23-27 in Full Score (Nueva York: Dover Publications, 1978), pp. 211, 216.
    ↑ Está basado en la partitura de la Alte Mozart-Ausgabe (Dover la republicó como se cita arriba), con la consulta del facsímil de "La Partitura Autógrafa" publicada por Pierpont Morgan Library/Dover Publications (citado más arriba). El facsímil solía eliminar las erratas añadidas por los editores de AMA que no eran de Mozart, e identificar las notas (mano izquierda) añadidas por André a la partitura de Mozart.
    ↑ Tyson, p. viii.
    ↑ Véase Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 26 in D Major ("Coronation"), K. 537--The Autograph Score. (Nueva York: The Pierpont Morgan Library en asociación con Dover Publications, 1991), pp. 8-11; 57-68.
    ↑ a b Einstein, p. 313.
    ↑ Como se indica en Tyson, p. xi.

Fuentes

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Neue Mozart-Ausgabe, Serie V, Werkgruppe 15, Band 8, ed. Wolfgang Rehm. (Baerenreiter-Verlag, Kassel, 1960; BA 4524). Reimprimido en Mozart: The Piano Concertos/Baerenreiter Urtext, ISMN M-006-20470-0, publicado en 2006. El "Concierto de la Coronación" se encuentra en las páginass pp. 3–92 (Vol. III, pp. 309*-398* en la edición reimpresa).
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Piano Concertos Nos. 23-27 in Full Score (Nueva York: Dover Publications, 1978). ISBN 0-486-23600-5. Reimpresión de la edición del siglo XIX de las Obras Completas de Mozart de Breitkopf & Härtel de estos conciertos; el "Concierto de la Coronación" está en las páginas pp. 187–242.
    Alfred Einstein, Mozart: His Character, His Work. Traducción al inglés de Arthur Mendel y Nathan Broder. (Londres: Oxford University Press, 1945). ISBN 0-19-500732-8.
    Alan Tyson, "Introduction", en Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 26 in D Major ("Coronation"), K. 537--The Autograph Score. (Nueva York: The Pierpont Morgan Library en asociación con Dover Publications, 1991), pp. vii-xi. ISBN 0-486-26747-4.
    Steven Ledbetter, "Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 26," notas al programa en la web de Pro Arte (en inglés).

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concierto_para_piano_n.%C2%BA_26_%28Mozart%29



video

Mozart concerto 26 (Coronation) - 2. Larghetto (Gulda)





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Mozart concerto 26 (Coronation) - 3. Allegretto (Gulda) - 3. Allegretto (Gulda)




The Piano Concerto No. 26 in D major, K. 537, was written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and completed on 24 February 1788. It is generally known as the "Coronation" Concerto.

Source of the nickname "Coronation"

The traditional name associated with this work is not Mozart's own, nor was the work written for the occasion for which posterity has named it. Mozart remarks in a letter to his wife in April 1789 that he had just performed this concerto at court. But the nickname "Coronation" is derived from his playing of the work at the time of the coronation of Leopold II as Holy Roman Emperor in October 1790 in Frankfurt am Main. At the same concert, Mozart also played the Piano Concerto No. 19, K. 459. We know this because when Johann André of Offenbach published the first editions of both concertos in 1794, he identified them on their title pages as being performed on the occasion of Leopold's coronation. Alan Tyson in his introduction to Dover Publications' facsimile of the autograph score (which today is at the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York) comments that "Although K. 459 has at times been called a 'Coronation' concerto, this title has nearly always been applied to K. 537".[1]
Movements of the concerto

The concerto has the following three movements:

    Allegro D major common time
    (Larghetto) A major cut time
    (Allegretto) D major 2/4

The second and third movements have their tempos given above in parentheses because in the autograph these are not given in Mozart's own handwriting but were written in by someone else. (The Neue Mozart-Ausgabe [NMA V/15/8, ed. Wolfgang Rehm] places the note "Tempobezeichnung im Autograph von fremder Hand" ["Tempo indication in autograph by another hand"] on both movements,[2] though the old Breitkopf & Härtel Complete Works edition does not have any indication that the tempos are not Mozart's own.[3])

The unfinished piano part

There is a very unusual feature to this concerto. In addition to omitting the tempi for two of the movements, Mozart also, in Tyson's words, "did not write any notes for the piano's left hand in a great many measures throughout the work."[5] As can be seen in the Dover Publications facsimile, large stretches of the solo part simply have nothing at all for the left hand, including the opening solo (movement 1, measures 81–99) and the whole of the second movement.[6] There is in fact no other Mozart piano concerto of which so much of the solo part was left unfinished by the composer. The 1794 first edition had these gaps filled in, and most Mozart scholars such as Alfred Einstein and Alan Tyson have assumed that the additions were made by the publisher Johann André. Einstein is on record as finding André's completion somewhat wanting: "For the most part, this version is extremely simple and not too offensive, but at times—for example, in the accompaniment of the Larghetto theme—it is very clumsy, and the whole solo part would gain infinitely by revision and refinement in Mozart's own style."[7]

Nearly all of the passages that necessitated filling in for the first edition lack only simple accompanimental patterns such as Alberti bass figures and chords. For example, measures 145–151 of the first movement, which involve more complicated virtuoso passagework, are fully written out in the autograph. For the less complex portions of the solo, it is clear that Mozart "knew perfectly well what he had to play"[8] and so left them incomplete.

The old Breitkopf & Härtel Mozart Complete Works score of this concerto does not make any distinction between what Mozart himself wrote and what André (or someone commissioned by him) supplied. However, the Neue Mozart-Ausgabe volume referenced above prints André's supplements in smaller type, to clearly distinguish them from Mozart's own notes.
Critical reception

While this concerto has enjoyed popularity due to its beauty and rococo (or galant) style, it is not generally regarded today to be of the level of quality of the twelve previous Viennese piano concertos or the final concerto in B flat.[9][10] This amounts to a complete reversal of critical opinion, since K. 537 was once one of Mozart's most celebrated keyboard concertos, especially during the 19th century. In 1935, Friedrich Blume, editor of the Eulenburg edition of this work, called it "the best known and most frequently played" of Mozart's piano concertos.[11] But writing in 1945, Einstein commented:

    ...It is very Mozartean, while at the same time it does not express the whole or even the half of Mozart. It is, in fact, so 'Mozartesque' that one might say that in it Mozart imitated himself—no difficult task for him. It is both brilliant and amiable, especially in the slow movement; it is very simple, even primitive, in its relation between the solo and the tutti, and so completely easy to understand that even the nineteenth century always grasped it without difficulty....[8]

Nonetheless, the "Coronation" concerto remains today frequently performed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piano_Concerto_No._26_%28Mozart%29



Music: Friedrich Gulda - Mozart Concerto 26 (Coronation) - 4 Vids - Data en Espanol and English - Links


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