NASA: It is happening now - Está sucediendo ahora - United States - 20-05-11 - Missouri Floodings

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 22:34


Open your mind, your heart to other cultures
Abra su mente, su corazón a otras culturas
You will be a better person
Usted será una mejor persona
RM

Flooding near New Madrid, Missouri

Flooding near New Madrid, Missouri
acquired May 12, 2011

Along a northward loop of the Mississippi River, near the city of New Madrid, flood water rested on agricultural fields in early May 2011. Taken from an altitude of 220 miles (350 kilometers) above the Earth, this astronaut photo shows muddy water filling a broad swath of cropland north of the river bend. In this image, north is toward the lower right.
Crops normally carpet the landscape north of New Madrid. This portion of Missouri, however, lies near the Birds Point-New Madrid Floodway. On May 2, 2011, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers breached a levee near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. The move spared the residents of Cairo, Illinois, but filled the floodway.
Astronaut photograph ISS027-E-27026 was acquired on May 12, 2011, with a Nikon D2Xs digital camera using a 400 mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by the Expedition 27 crew. The image in this article has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast. Lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory as part of the ISS National Lab to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by Michon Scott, based on material from the International Space Station photo gallery.
Instrument: 
ISS - Digital Camera

Mississippi Floods in Missouri and Tennessee

Mississippi Floods in Missouri and Tennessee
acquired May 12, 2011

Along the border between Tennessee and southeastern Missouri, the Mississippi River spilled onto floodplains, submerging agricultural fields on either side of the river. Taken from an altitude of 220 miles (350 kilometers) above the Earth, this astronaut photo shows muddy water resting on croplands. In this image, north is toward the lower right.
The land cover around the Mississippi in this region is a combination of forest (dark green) and cropland (rectangles of green and brown). Where muddy water has inundated fields, the borders of some fields peek through the water, appearing as green lines. Along the eastern bank of the Mississippi (image center), a double loop pushes away from the river. This long-term feature (not the result of 2011 flooding) is likely transitioning to an oxbow lake.
Astronaut photograph ISS027-E-27023 was acquired on May 12, 2011, with a Nikon D2Xs digital camera using a 400 mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by the Expedition 27 crew. The image in this article has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast. Lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory as part of the ISS National Lab to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by Michon Scott, based on material from the International Space Station photo gallery.
Instrument: 
ISS - Digital Camera
 
 

Mississippi Floods in Arkansas and Tennessee

 
Mississippi Floods in Arkansas and Tennessee
  acquired May 12, 2011

The Mississippi River spilled over its banks in Arkansas and Tennessee on May 12, 2011, as the International Space Station passed overhead. This astronaut photograph shows muddy water sitting on floodplains around Tomato, Arkansas, as well as extensive flooding to the north.
Flood waters around Tomato appear confined by an embankment in the west. The embankment extends southward from a bend in the Mississippi. West of the embankment lies a patchwork of agricultural fields. East of the river lies an expanse of dark green forest, the Anderson-Tully State Wildlife Management Area.
Astronaut photograph ISS027-E-27019 was acquired on May 12, 2011, with a Nikon D2Xs digital camera using a 400 mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by the Expedition 27 crew. The image in this article has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast. Lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory as part of the ISS National Lab to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by Michon Scott, based on material from the International Space Station photo gallery.
Instrument: 
ISS - Digital Camera
 
 
 

Morganza Spillway Opens in Louisiana

 Morganza Spillway Opens in Louisiana
 acquired May 15, 2011
 Morganza Spillway Opens in Louisiana
  acquired May 14, 2011


On May 14, 2011, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers opened the Morganza Spillway in an attempt to ease flooding along the Mississippi River in Louisiana. The decision was made to protect the heavily populated areas and infrastructure around the ports of Baton Rouge and New Orleans. The decision is not without cost, however, to the thousands of people who are likely to lose homes and farms within the flood plain downstream.
On May 15, the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite captured this natural-color image (top) of the Morganza Floodway. The image was acquired at 11:20 a.m. Central Daylight Time, one day after the spillway was partially opened. The lower photo was taken on May 14 by the Army Corps, several hours after water began streaming onto the floodway.
The flood control structure, or spillway, includes 125 gates, 11 of which had been opened as of noon on May 16. In the satellite image, the white pixels near the spillway are whitewater churned up by the flow through the gates; the downloadable large image shows this in much finer detail. Square and quadrilateral shapes on the landscape show areas that were cleared for farming or perhaps shaped for flood control earthworks.
In the natural color satellite, water ranges in colors of olive, tan, black, and gray, reflecting the different loads of muddy sediment churned up from the bottom; darker areas might also reflect deeper water. Past the spillway, water is more readily apparent along the levee on the south and east side of the floodway, suggesting that there are fewer trees and perhaps lower elevations in those areas. Potential inundation maps (PDF) from the Army Corps appear to confirm that, as water levels are projected to rise to 10–15 feet (3–4.5 meters) in the southern and eastern areas and 5–10 feet (1.5–3 meters) in the northern and western areas in the image above.
Green areas do not necessarily mean a lack of water. As the aerial photo shows, much of the floodway is covered with trees that will shield the water below from the eyes of satellite sensors. Water is somewhat easier to spot in the near-infrared and shortwave infrared image linked below the top photo.
Video of the opening of the Morganza Floodway can be viewed online here. The floodway was last opened in 1973, the first and only time it was used before 2011.
NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using EO-1 ALI data. Photograph courtesy Team New Orleans, US Army Corps of Engineers. Caption by Mike Carlowicz.
Instrument: 
EO-1 - ALI



NASA: It is happening now - Está sucediendo ahora - United States - 20-05-11 - Missouri Floodings




You have an alphabetical guide in the foot of the page in the blog: solitary dog sculptor
In the blog: Solitary Dog Sculptor I, the alphabetical guide is on the right side of the page
Thanks

Usted tiene una guía alfabética al pie de la página en el blog: solitary dog sculptor
En el blog: Solitary Dog Sculptor I, la guia alfabética está en el costado derecho de la página
Gracias




Ricardo M Marcenaro - Facebook

Blogs in operation of The Solitary Dog:

solitary dog sculptor:
http://byricardomarcenaro.blogspot.com

Solitary Dog Sculptor I:
http://byricardomarcenaroi.blogspot.com

Para:
comunicarse conmigo,
enviar materiales para publicar,
propuestas comerciales:
marcenaroescultor@gmail.com

For:
contact me,
submit materials for publication,
commercial proposals:
marcenaroescultor@gmail.com

Diario La Nación
Argentina
Cuenta Comentarista en el Foro:
Capiscum

My blogs are an open house to all cultures, religions and countries. Be a follower if you like it, with this action you are building a new culture of tolerance, open mind and heart for peace, love and human respect.

Thanks :)

Mis blogs son una casa abierta a todas las culturas, religiones y países. Se un seguidor si quieres, con esta acción usted está construyendo una nueva cultura de la tolerancia, la mente y el corazón abiertos para la paz, el amor y el respeto humano.

Gracias :)








Comments (0)

Publicar un comentario