Sculpture - Escultura: Auguste Rodin - Part 2 - Link

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 19:05


Open your mind, your heart to other cultures
Abra su mente, su corazón a otras culturas
You will be a better person
Usted será una mejor persona
RM

Iris, Messenger of the Gods, also known as Another Voice, Called Iris, modeled ca. 1895, this bronze cast 1965
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Bronze, on a black marble base

H. 19 1/16 in. (48.6 cm)
Gift of B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, 1984 (1984.364.7)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

In a letter of December 28, 1890, Rodin mentioned that his new model for the second version of the Monument to Victor Hugo, also called The Apotheosis of Victor Hugo, would include a figure of Iris supported by a cloud. In the model, the figure is more or less complete; supplied with wings, it hovers, head down, above the standing figure of Hugo.

When in 1900 Rodin assembled a retrospective exhibition of sculpture and drawings in his own pavilion on the Place de l'Alma in Paris, he presented the figure of Iris as Another Voice, Called Iris (Autre voix, dit Iris). In the catalogue of a recent re-creation of the 1900 exhibition, Antoinette Le Normand-Romain noted that a cast of the reworked figure was to be seen in a photograph taken about 1896 or 1898. Rodin had detached it from the Monument to Victor Hugo, removed the wings, head, and one arm, and lifted the right leg high in the air.

While the extraction of a figure from a larger group or composition was a continuation of the working method begun with The Gates of Hell, the Iris was considerably more daring than the sculptures derived from The Gates. Now, Rodin was subtracting body parts as well, and in the new position of the leg, he was deliberately directing the eye of the viewer to the figure's genitals.

Source: Auguste Rodin: Iris, Messenger of the Gods, also known as Another Voice, Called Iris (1984.364.7) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


The Old Courtesan, modeled 1887, this bronze cast 1910
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Bronze

H. 19 3/4 in. (50.2 cm)
Gift of Thomas F. Ryan, 1910 (11.173.3)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

Also called She Who Was Once the Helmet-Maker's Beautiful Wife (Celle qui fut la belle heaulmière), a title taken from the poem "Les Regrets de la Belle Heaulmière" by François Villon (1431–ca. 1463), this sculpture derives from a bas-relief on the lower part of the left pilaster of The Gates of Hell. It is one of the many figures that Rodin extracted from the model for the monumental portal and reworked as individual sculptures to be purchased by collectors. The subject for this figure was an Italian woman who had once been a professional model. Rodin used her aged body for several studies and for groups of figures, as well as for this starkly realistic sculpture. In the Paris Salon of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts in 1890, it was called simply Old Woman (Vielle femme), suggesting that both titles, The Old Courtesan and She Who Was Once the Helmet-Maker's Beautiful Wife, may have been fanciful afterthoughts.

Source: Auguste Rodin: The Old Courtesan (11.173.3) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


Orpheus and Eurydice, probably modeled before 1887, executed 1893
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Marble
Orpheus and Eurydice, probably modeled before 1887, executed 1893
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Marble

H. 50 in. (127 cm)
Gift of Thomas F. Ryan, 1910 (10.63.2)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

Originally modeled for The Gates of Hell, where it was apparently intended to illustrate a poem from Baudelaire's The Flowers of Evil, this group was abandoned in the final version of The Gates. Rodin gave it a second existence with a title inspired by a story from Ovid's Metamorphoses. The body of Eurydice is recognizable as that of one of the anguished figures that occupy the lintel of The Gates on the left of the Thinker, and it exemplifies Rodin's propensity for exploring the multiple interpretations that a single form can be made to yield. This marble was purchased by Charles T. Yerkes about 1893, beginning what would prove to be more than a century of private collecting of Rodin's sculpture in America.

Source: Auguste Rodin: Orpheus and Eurydice (10.63.2) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


 
Rodin—The Eve, 1907
Edward Steichen (American, born Luxembourg, 1879–1973)
Autochrome

6 1/4 x 3 7/8 in. (15.9 x 9.8 cm)
Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1955 (55.635.9)
Not on view   Last Updated April 19, 2011

Albert Elsen's In Rodin's Studio: A Photographic Record of Sculpture in the Making has shown the importance to Rodin of photography, not only in the sale of his sculptures, but also in the process of creation of those sculptures. Elsen cited Eugène Druet as well as a number of others in this connection, but probably no other photographer of Rodin's sculpture has been quite as inspired as Edward Steichen. Steichen visited Rodin for the first time in 1900. He brought a portfolio of his photographs with him and, after looking through the portfolio, Rodin allowed the American to photograph him in his studio. The results have been justly termed "among the best ever made." In this exquisite autochrome, an early type of color transparency, signed and dated 1907, Steichen recorded the aging sculptor clothed in timeless drapery and sitting at the feet of the plaster model of his Eve, a soft-focus image that appears almost as the sculptor's dream.

Source: Edward Steichen: Rodin--The Eve (55.635.9) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


 
Pair of Nude Male Figures, Demonstrating the Principles of Contrapposto According to Michelangelo and Phidias, ca. 1911
Auguste Rodin (French, 1847–1917)
Terracotta

H. (each) 14 1/2 in. (36.8 cm)
Gift of B. Gerald Cantor Art Foundation, 1987 (1987.179.1,.2)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

The Metropolitan Museum’s Rodins sparked the initial enthusiasm of one of the great collectors of the art of the French sculptor. In a spirit of reciprocity, B. Gerald Cantor and his wife, Iris, gave more than thirty sculptures by Rodin to the Museum during the 1980s. The two figures from the collection of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney were presented to her by Rodin during a visit to his studio in Paris at the Hôtel Biron in 1911.

Source: Auguste Rodin: Pair of Nude Male Figures, Demonstrating the Principles of Contrapposto According to Michelangelo and Phidias (1987.179.1,.2) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


 
Rodin—The Thinker, 1902
Edward Steichen (American, born Luxembourg, 1879–1973)
Gum bichromate print

15 9/16 x 19 in. (39.6 x 48.3 cm)
Gilman Collection, Purchase, Harriette and Noel Levine Gift, 2005 (2005.100.289)
Not on view   Last Updated April 19, 2011

When Steichen arrived in Paris in 1900, the Rodin Pavilion outside the Exposition Universelle was his first stop, and he saw not only the master's work but the master himself—"a stocky man with a massive head . . . and I made up my mind I was going to photograph him someday." Only after visiting the revered sculptor's studio, nearly every Saturday for a year, did Steichen finally dare to photograph him. Steichen described Rodin's studio as being so crowded with marble blocks and works in clay, plaster, and bronze that he had to compose his portrait from two exposures, one of Rodin and the Monument to Victor Hugo and another of The Thinker. He first printed each image separately and, having mastered the difficulties of combining the two negatives, joined them together in a single picture. The result is among the most ambitious efforts of any Pictorialist photographer to emulate art in the grand tradition. Suppressing the texture of the marble and bronze and thus emphasizing the presence of the sculptures as living entities, Steichen was able to assimilate the artist into the heroic world of his creations. Posed in relief against his work, Rodin seems to contemplate his own alter ego in The Thinker, while the luminous figure of Victor Hugo suggests poetic inspiration as the source of his creativity.

Source: Edward Steichen: Rodin—The Thinker (2005.100.289) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


 
Torso (A Study for Ariane without Arms), modeled ca. 1905 or earlier
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Terracotta

L. 11 5/8 in. (29.5 cm)
Gift of the sculptor, 1912 (12.13.1)
On view: Gallery 800   Last Updated April 19, 2011

In his studies made of plaster, wax, and terracotta, Rodin often fought the burden of narrative to concentrate instead on some problem connected with the increasingly deep assaults that his sculpture tended to make on the human form. Sometimes distortions were due to accidents in the studio that triggered Rodin's imagination. Some were the results of the sculptor's efforts to render the physical effects of the extremes of old age, emotional stress or violent physical activity. Others, such as this torso, intended as a study for a marble tomb figure, are true fragments resulting from a working method peculiar to Rodin: the deliberate breaking apart of sculptures in order to reassemble the parts in new ways. The scars left by the removal of the head, arms, and legs, and the separation of the torso from its original base are permanently preserved in this terracotta torso.

Source: Auguste Rodin: Torso (A Study for Ariane without Arms) (12.13.1) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


 
 Two Hands, modeled and cast at an unknown date
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Plaster

L. of hand at left: 2 in. (5.1 cm); at right: 2 3/8 in. (6 cm)
Gift of the sculptor, 1912 (12.12.18,.17)
Not on view   Last Updated April 19, 2011

Rodin was fascinated by the expressive possibilities of hands: hands gesturing in anguish as in The Burghers of Calais, small studies of hands pulsing with life, giant enigmatic hands sufficient unto themselves. The poet Rainer Maria Rilke (1875–1926), who was for a time Rodin's secretary, wrote: "There are among the works of Rodin's hands, single small hands, which without belonging to a body, are alive. Hands that rise, irritated and in wrath; hands whose five bristling fingers seem to bark like the five jaws of a dog of Hell."

Source: Auguste Rodin: Two Hands (12.12.18,.17) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art


 
Victor Hugo, Three-Quarter View, 1885
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917)
Drypoint, second of eight described states

9 x 7 in. (22.9 x 17.8 cm)
Rogers Fund, 1916 (16.37.2)
Not on view   Last Updated April 19, 2011

The author of Notre-Dame de Paris (1831) and Les Misérables (1862) was an old man when Rodin proposed to make his portrait. Hugo's patience with sittings had been strained to the breaking point by another sculptor whose efforts are reported to have produced a mediocre bust. Moreover, Hugo's devoted mistress Juliette Drouet was dying of cancer. Details of the story vary, but the earliest published accounts agree that Rodin was permitted to be present in the Hugo household and to make sketches, but that the poet would not actually pose. Rodin made dozens of drawings from every possible viewpoint, some rapidly sketched on the spot and others from memory, before being allowed to set up a modeling stand in an out-of-the-way corner to work in clay. From these preliminaries Rodin created the bust of Hugo that he first exhibited at the Salon of the Société des Artistes Français in 1884. A series of splendidly executed prints followed. The fifth state of this Three-Quarter View was published in the journal L'Artiste in February 1885.

Source: Auguste Rodin: Victor Hugo, Three-Quarter View (16.37.2) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art





 

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Sculpture - Escultura: Auguste Rodin - Part 2 - Link

 


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