Poetry - Poesia: Charles Bukowski - We Ain't Got No Money. Honey. But We Got Rain - No Tenemos Dinero. Tesoro. Pero Tenemos Lluvia - Links

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 5:49




We Ain't Got No Money, Honey, But We Got Rain

call it the greenhouse effect or whatever
but it just doesn't rain like it used to.
I particularly remember the rains of the
depression era.
there wasn't any money but there was
plenty of rain.
it wouldn't rain for just a night or
a day,
it would RAIN for 7 days and 7
nights
and in Los Angeles the storm drains
weren't built to carry off taht much
water
and the rain came down THICK and
MEAN and
STEADY
and you HEARD it banging against
the roofs and into the ground
waterfalls of it came down
from roofs
and there was HAIL
big ROCKS OF ICE
bombing
exploding smashing into things
and the rain
just wouldn't
STOP
and all the roofs leaked-
dishpans,
cooking pots
were placed all about;
they dripped loudly
and had to be emptied
again and
again.
the rain came up over the street curbings,
across the lawns, climbed up the steps and
entered the houses.
there were mops and bathroom towels,
and the rain often came up through the
toilets:bubbling, brown, crazy,whirling,
and all the old cars stood in the streets,
cars that had problems starting on a
sunny day,
and the jobless men stood
looking out the windows
at the old machines dying
like living things out there.
the jobless men,
failures in a failing time
were imprisoned in their houses with their
wives and children
and their
pets.
the pets refused to go out
and left their waste in
strange places.
the jobless men went mad
confined with
their once beautiful wives.
there were terrible arguments
as notices of foreclosure
fell into the mailbox.
rain and hail, cans of beans,
bread without butter;fried
eggs, boiled eggs, poached
eggs; peanut butter
sandwiches, and an invisible
chicken in every pot.
my father, never a good man
at best, beat my mother
when it rained
as I threw myself
between them,
the legs, the knees, the
screams
until they
seperated.
"I'll kill you," I screamed
at him. "You hit her again
and I'll kill you!"
"Get that son-of-a-bitching
kid out of here!"
"no, Henry, you stay with
your mother!"
all the households were under
seige but I believe that ours
held more terror than the
average.
and at night
as we attempted to sleep
the rains still came down
and it was in bed
in the dark
watching the moon against
the scarred window
so bravely
holding out
most of the rain,
I thought of Noah and the
Ark
and I thought, it has come
again.
we all thought
that.
and then, at once, it would
stop.
and it always seemed to
stop
around 5 or 6 a.m.,
peaceful then,
but not an exact silence
because things continued to
drip
  drip
    drip

and there was no smog then
and by 8 a.m.
there was a
blazing yellow sunlight,
Van Gogh yellow-
crazy, blinding!
and then
the roof drains
relieved of the rush of
water
began to expand in the warmth:
PANG!PANG!PANG!
and everybody got up and looked outside
and there were all the lawns
still soaked
greener than green will ever
be
and there were birds
on the lawn
CHIRPING like mad,
they hadn't eaten decently
for 7 days and 7 nights
and they were weary of
berries
and
they waited as the worms
rose to the top,
half drowned worms.
the birds plucked them
up
and gobbled them
down;there were
blackbirds and sparrows.
the blackbirds tried to
drive the sparrows off
but the sparrows,
maddened with hunger,
smaller and quicker,
got their
due.
the men stood on their porches
smoking cigarettes,
now knowing
they'd have to go out
there
to look for that job
that probably wasn't
there, to start that car
that probably wouldn't
start.
and the once beautiful
wives
stood in their bathrooms
combing their hair,
applying makeup,
trying to put their world back
together again,
trying to forget that
awful sadness that
gripped them,
wondering what they could
fix for
breakfast.
and on the radio
we were told that
school was now
open.
and
soon
there I was
on the way to school,
massive puddles in the
street,
the sun like a new
world,
my parents back in that
house,
I arrived at my classroom
on time.
Mrs. Sorenson greeted us
with, "we won't have our
usual recess, the grounds
are too wet."
"AW!" most of the boys
went.
"but we are going to do
something special at
recess," she went on,
"and it will be
fun!"
well, we all wondered
what that would
be
and the two hour wait
seemed a long time
as Mrs.Sorenson
went about
teaching her
lessons.
I looked at the little
girls, they looked so
pretty and clean and
alert,
they sat still and
straight
and their hair was
beautiful
in the California
sunshine.
the the recess bells rang
and we all waited for the
fun.
then Mrs. Sorenson told us:
"now, what we are going to
do is we are going to tell
each other what we did
during the rainstorm!
we'll begin in the front row
and go right around!
now, Michael, you're first!. . ."
well, we all began to tell
our stories, Michael began
and it went on and on,
and soon we realized that
we were all lying, not
exactly lying but mostly
lying and some of the boys
began to snicker and some
of the girls began to give
them dirty looks and
Mrs.Sorenson said,
"all right! I demand a
modicum of silence
here!
I am interested in what
you did
during the rainstorm
even if you
aren't!"
so we had to tell our
stories and they were
stories.
one girl said that
when the rainbow first
came
she saw God's face
at the end of it.
only she didn't say which end.
one boy said he stuck
his fishing pole
out the window
and caught a little
fish
and fed it to his
cat.
almost everybody told
a lie.
the truth was just
too awful and
embarassing to tell.
then the bell rang
and recess was
over.
"thank you," said Mrs.
Sorenson, "that was very
nice.
and tomorrow the grounds
will be dry
and we will put them
to use
again."
most of the boys
cheered
and the little girls
sat very straight and
still,
looking so pretty and
clean and
alert,
their hair beautiful in a sunshine that
the world might never see
again.
and
 

 NO TENEMOS DINERO, TESORO, PERO TENEMOS LLUVIA

Llámenle efecto invernadero o lo que sea
pero, simplemente, ya no llueve
como antes.
Recuerdo en particular las lluvias de
la época de la depresión.
No había nada de dinero pero había
mucha lluvia.
No llovía sólo una noche o
un día.
LLOVÍA 7 días y 7
noches
y los sumideros de Los Ángeles
no estaban hechos para tragar tanta
agua
y la lluvia caía GRUESA,
MALVADA y
CONSTANTE
y se OÍA como golpeaba contra
los tejados y en el suelo
cataratas de agua caían desde los tejados
y muchas veces GRANIZABA
gruesos GRANOS DE HIELO
como bombas
que explotaban
y se estrellaban contra las cosas
y la lluvia,
simplemente, no
CESABA
y todos los tejados tenían goteras.
Cacerolas,
pucheros
por todas partes;
goteaba ruidosamente
y había que vaciarlos
una y otra
vez.
La lluvia alcanzaba los bordes de las veredas,
invadía el césped, subía por las escaleras y
entraba en las casas.
Había trapos de pisos y toallas
y la lluvia muchas veces llegaba a los
retretes, burbujeando, marrón, enloquecida,
en remolinos
y los coches viejos estaban en las calles,
coches a los que les costaba arrancar hasta en
días soleados.
Y los hombres que se habían quedado sin trabajo
miraban por la ventana
a sus viejas máquinas que morían
como objetos vivos
allá afuera.
Los desocupados,
fracasados en época de fracasos,
estaban prisioneros en sus casas con sus
esposas, sus hijos
y sus
mascotas,
que se negaban a salir
y dejaban excrementos en
lugares impropios.
Los desocupados se volvían locos
confinados con
sus mujeres, en otro tiempo hermosas.
Había terribles peleas
mientras las notificaciones con desahucio
caían en los buzones.
Lluvia y gritos, latas de porotos,
pan sin manteca, huevos
fritos, huevos duros, huevos
escalfados, bocadillos de
manteca de maní y un pollo
invisible
en cada puchero.
Mi padre, jamás un buen hombre
en el mejor de los casos, le pegaba a mi madre
cuando llovía,
y yo me metía entre ellos,
piernas, rodillas,
gritos
hasta que
se separaban.
"Te voy a matar" le gritaba yo
a mi padre, " si le volvés a pegar,
te mato".
"Sacá a este pendejo
hijo de puta del medio"
"No Henry, quedate
con tu mamá".
Todas las familias sufrían
pero creo que la nuestra
estaba sometida a un terror
mayor que la media.
Y por la noche
cuando intentábamos dormir
la lluvia seguía cayendo
y en la cama
en la oscuridad
al mirar la luna contra
la ventana rajada
que impedía que entrara
la mayor parte de la lluvia
yo pensaba en Noé y en el
Arca
y pensaba que el diluvio
había vuelto
todos lo
pensábamos.
Y después de pronto
paraba.
Parece que siempre
paraba
a eso de las 5 o 6 de la madrugada,
que paz entonces,
pero no exactamente silencio
porque las cosas seguían haciendo
ping
      ping
          ping

y ya no había niebla
y a las ocho de la mañana
había una
ardiente luz amarilla
- de un amarillo Van Ghog-
loca, cegadora
y después
los desagües del tejado
aliviados del caudal de
agua
empezaban a expandirse con
el calor
PANG PANG PANG
y todo el mundo se levantaba
y miraba afuera,
todo el césped
empapado,
más verde,
y allí estaban los pájaros
sobre el césped
PIANDO como locos,
no habían comido decentemente
durante 7 días y 7 noches
y estaban hartos de
bayas y
esperaban que los gusanos,
gusanos casi ahogados,
salieran a la superficie.
Los pájaros
tiraban de ellos para arriba
y se los echaban garganta abajo;
había mirlos y gorriones,
pero éstos
enloquecidos por el hambre,
más pequeños y más rápidos,
conseguían su
propósito.
Los hombres estaban de pie en sus porches
fumando cigarrillos,
y sabían
que había que salir
a buscar empleo
que probablemente no
existía, que había que arrancar ese coche
que probablemente no
arrancaría.
Y las en otro tiempo hermosas
mujeres
estaban en cuartos de baño
peinándose,
maquillándose,
intentando recomponer
su mundo,
intentando olvidar esa
terrible depresión que
las atenazaba,
preguntándose qué podrían
preparar para
el desayuno.
Y en la radio
nos decían que
la escuela ya había
abierto
y
poco después
allí estaba yo
de camino a la escuela,
enormes charcos en las
calles,
el sol como un nuevo
mundo
mis padres de vuelta en aquella
casa,
y yo llegando a clases
en punto.
La señora Sorenson nos recibió
con un " no tendremos
recreo, como siempre el patio
está demasiado encharcado"
"OHHHH", dijo la mayoría
de los chicos.
"Pero vamos a hacer algo especial
a la hora
del recreo", continuo diciendo
"y va a ser divertido."
Bueno, todos nos preguntábamos
en qué consistiría
y las dos horas de espera
mientras la señora Sorenson
iba impartiendo
sus lecciones
se nos hicieron largas.
Yo miraba a las
nenitas, tan lindas
todas, tan limpias y
atentas,
sentadas quietas y
derechas
y su pelo era
hermoso
bajo el sol
de California.
Después sonó la campana del recreo
y todos esperábamos
la diversión.
Entonces la señora Sorenson nos
dijo:
"ahora lo que vamos a hacer
es contarnos
unos a otros lo que hicimos
durante la tormenta.
Vamos a empezar
por la primera
fila y después con las siguientes
Michael vos
empezás."
Bueno empezamos a contar
nuestras historias. Michael empezó
y siguió otro y después otro,
enseguida nos dimos cuenta de que
todos estábamos mintiendo, no
exactamente mintiendo, algún chico
empezó a reírse y alguna chica
empezó a lanzar
miradas aviesas y
la señora Sorenson dijo:
"Bueno
¡Un poco de silencio!
A mí me interesa lo que
hicieron
durante la tormenta
aunque a ustedes
no."
Así que tuvimos que contar nuestras
historias, y eso si que eran
historias.
Una nenita dijo que
cuando salió el arco iris
la primera vez
había visto el rostro de Dios
en uno de los extremos.
Pero no explicó
en cual.
Un nene dijo que había sacado
la caña de pescar
por la ventana
y había sacado un
pescadito
y se lo había dado a su
gato.
Casi todo el mundo contó
mentiras
la verdad era simplemente
demasiado espantosa y
embarazosa
de contar.
Y después sonó la campana,
el recreo
había terminado.
"Gracias", dijo la señora
Sorenson, "estuvo muy
bueno"
mañana el patio
estará seco
y podremos utilizarlo
de nuevo"
La mayoría de los chicos
aplaudió
y las nenitas
siguieron sentadas
derechas,
quietas,
tan lindas,
limpias y
atentas,
con sus cabellos hermosos
bajo un sol que
el mundo
no volvería a ver jamás.-





Poetry - Poesia: Charles Bukowski - We Ain't Got No Money. Honey. But We Got Rain - No Tenemos Dinero. Tesoro. Pero Tenemos Lluvia - Links



In English




En Español



Cartas     








Ricardo M Marcenaro - Facebook

Operative blogs of The Solitary Dog:

solitary dog sculptor:
http://byricardomarcenaro.blogspot.com

Solitary Dog Sculptor I:
http://byricardomarcenaroi.blogspot.com

Para:
comunicarse conmigo,
enviar materiales para publicar,
propuestas:
marcenaroescultor@gmail.com

For:
contact me,
submit materials for publication,
proposals:
marcenaroescultor@gmail.com

Diario La Nación
Argentina
Cuenta Comentarista en el Foro:
Capiscum

My blogs are an open house to all cultures, religions and countries. Be a follower if you like it, with this action you are building a new culture of tolerance, open mind and heart for peace, love and human respect.

Thanks :)

Mis blogs son una casa abierta a todas las culturas, religiones y países. Se un seguidor si quieres, con esta acción usted está construyendo una nueva cultura de la tolerancia, la mente y el corazón abiertos para la paz, el amor y el respeto humano.

Gracias :)

 

Comments (0)

Publicar un comentario