Sculpture - Escultura: Henry Moore - 1960-69 - Part 1 - Links

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 22:33


 Two-Piece Reclining Figure No. 2  1960

Bronze
object: 1250 x 2900 x 1375 mm
sculpture

Purchased 1960

T00395
The holes and gouged surfaces of this sculpture are reminiscent of eroded cliffs. According to Moore this fusion of human and landscape forms served as ‘a metaphor of the relationship of humanity with the earth’. The character of that relationship, however, remains open to interpretation. It could suggest a harmonious union of mankind with nature or equally a crisis-ridden sense of isolation and fragmentation.

 (From the display caption September 2004)


 Headless Animal  1960

Bronze
object: 159 x 225 x 95 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978

T02283

When Moore presented this piece to Tate he explained that animals had always interested him as a subject for sculpture because they posed entirely different problems from the sculptor of the human figure. He liked them above all for their energy and vitality. In Headless Animal he was concerned primarily with the body and legs of the imaginary creature and felt the sculpture would look better without a head, focussing attention solely on the rhythmic form of the torso.
 (From the display caption February 2010)



 Three Part Object  1960

Bronze
object: 1264 x 718 x 613 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978



 Two Piece Reclining Figure No. 3  1961

Bronze
object: 1585 x 2800 x 1370 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978



 Three-Quarter Figure  1961

Cast material
object: 391 x 232 x 130 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978

T02288

With the figure’s broad hips and swelling breasts and abdomen, Moore gives this sculpture a strongly feminine character, full of ripe fertility. It holds a strong resemblance to the Willendorf Venus, an ancient limestone figurine Moore greatly admired that was carved around 23,000 BC. However, Moore drew on very varied visual sources of inspiration for his sculpture, both human and animal. He compared Three-Quarter Figure to a hippopotamus.
 (From the display caption February 2010)



 Three Piece Reclining Figure No. 1  1961-2

Bronze
object: 1700 x 2800 x 1370 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978




Reclining Figure: Bunched  1961

Bronze
object: 130 x 166 x 93 mm
sculpture

Presented by Gustav and Elly Kahnweiler 1974, accessioned 1994

T06826
By the mid-1950s Moore had almost entirely eliminated drawing from his creative process and explored his ideas through small maquettes. These had an intrinsic quality of immediacy or spontaneity and allowed him to imagine the finished product in the round. In order to translate the scale of the work more effectively, he often made larger working models as an intermediate stage between the maquette and the finished sculpture. Moore’s maquettes were typically cast in bronze in editions of up to ten. The sculptor strove for monumentality in his work and tried to imbue the same quality in the small maquettes. He also took a great deal of care with their finish. Some were more polished than others, some darker, some greener. Moore did all the patination himself, treating the bronze with different acids to achieve different effects then working on it by hand, rubbing and wearing it down.
 (From the display caption September 2004)



 Working Model for Knife-Edge Two-Piece  1962

Bronze
object: 498 x 711 x 330 mm
sculpture

Purchased 1963



 Square Forms  1963-68

Lithograph on paper
image: 543 x 759 mm
on paper, print

Presented by the artist 1975



Seventeen Reclining Figures  1963-9

Lithograph on paper
image: 432 x 543 mm
on paper, print

Presented by the artist 1975




Sculpture - Escultura: Henry Moore - 1960-69 - Part 1 - Links 







 



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