Sculpture - Escultura: Henry Moore - 1950-59 - Part 2 - Links

Posted by ricardo marcenaro | Posted in | Posted on 17:34

 Animal Head  1956

Bronze
object: 570 x 515 x 290 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978



 Upright Motive No. 1: Glenkiln Cross  1955-6

Bronze
object: 3327 x 978 x 965 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978

T02274
In the mid 1950s, Moore made twelve Upright Motives. These three, though often displayed together, have also been shown independently. A cast of Upright Motive No.2, for example, is sited in the centre of Harlow. Likewise, a cast of Upright Motive No.1: Glenkiln Cross can be found on the Glenkiln estate in Scotland.

 (From the display caption August 2004)



 Falling Warrior  1956-7

Bronze
object: 650 x 1540 x 850 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978

T02278
In the aftermath of the Second World War and the Holocaust the rhetorical manner of much pre-war public art was discredited. Moore’s work offered an alternative, more humane form of public sculpture. Such sculptures as Falling Warrior and Warrior with Shield 1953-4 inevitably evoked memories of conflict, the latter becoming a war memorial in the city of Arnhem in Holland.

 (From the display caption August 2004)




 Maquette for Fallen Warrior  1956

Bronze
object: 140 x 155 x 265 mm
sculpture

Presented by Gustav and Elly Kahnweiler 1974, accessioned 1994

T06824
By the mid-1950s Moore had almost entirely eliminated drawing from his creative process and explored his ideas through small maquettes. These had an intrinsic quality of immediacy or spontaneity and allowed him to imagine the finished product in the round. In order to translate the scale of the work more effectively, he often made larger working models as an intermediate stage between the maquette and the finished sculpture. Moore’s maquettes were typically cast in bronze in editions of up to ten. The sculptor strove for monumentality in his work and tried to imbue the same quality in the small maquettes. He also took a great deal of care with their finish. Some were more polished than others, some darker, some greener. Moore did all the patination himself, treating the bronze with different acids to achieve different effects then working on it by hand, rubbing and wearing it down.
 (From the display caption September 2004)




 Maquette for Figure on Steps  1956

Bronze
object: 167 x 182 x 163 mm
sculpture

Bequeathed by Elly Kahnweiler 1991 to form part of the gift of Gustav and Elly Kahnweiler, accessioned 1994




 Working Model for Unesco Reclining Figure  1957

Bronze
object: 1440 x 2440 x 1220 mm, 730 kg
sculpture

Presented by the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1960

T00390
This sculpture is related to the UNESCO Reclining Figure at UNESCO’s Paris headquarters shown in the photograph above. That work is carved from travertine marble and is unique. This smaller bronze sculpture is in an edition of six. As with his other public sculptures Moore sought to avoid narrative or overt rhetoric. The universal significance attributed to Moore’s sculpture made it particularly appropriate for a global organisation such as UNESCO.

 (From the display caption September 2004)



 Seated Woman  1957

Cast material
object: 1488 x 1394 x 914 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978



 Woman  1957-8

Bronze
object: 1441 x 791 x 921 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978

T02280
This is one of the largest of Moore's sculptures of a seated female nude, and it was cast in an edition of nine. The original plaster is in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, and the curator there, Alan Wilkinson, has described this sculpture as 'one of the most potent images of fertility produced in the 20th century'. He also related it to Moore's early interest in Palaeolithic sculpture, an influence the artist readily acknowledged. Moore wrote of the work: ''Woman' has that startling fullness of the stomach and breasts. The smallness of the head is necessary to emphasize the massiveness of the body - if the head had been any larger it would have ruined the whole idea of the sculpture.'
 (From the display caption September 2004)



 Draped Reclining Woman  1957-8

Bronze
1346 x 2083 x 914 mm
sculpture

Presented by Gustav and Elly Kahnweiler 1974, accessioned 1994




 Eight Reclining Figures  1958

Lithograph on paper
image: 311 x 257 mm
on paper, print

Presented by Curwen Studio through the Institute of Contemporary Prints 1975




 Three Motives against a Wall No. I  1958

Bronze
object: 505 x 1080 x 440 mm
sculpture

Transferred from the Victoria & Albert Museum 1983

T03763



 Bird  1959

Bronze
object: 121 x 375 x 130 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978



 Three Motives against Wall No. 2  1959

Bronze
object: 460 x 1083 x 381 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978



Relief No. 1  1959

Bronze
object: 2219 x 1251 x 498 mm
sculpture

Presented by the artist 1978


Sculpture - Escultura: Henry Moore - 1950-59 - Part 2 - Links 







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